Login or Join
Search thousands of jobs, or upload your resume and let employers find you
Helpful documents
ARTICLES
VIDEOS
Q & A
(83)
(16)
(11)
Job seeking is a full time job
Job search
Time for a new job
A true story… A candidate was applying for a job that he felt was probably beyond him in terms of experience and skills, however he figured he'd apply and "hope for the best". The job application asked for a resume and personally written cover letter to be submitted to the hiring manager. When the candidate went to send the resume and cover letter he decided that instead of writing the generic "To whom it may concern" on the top of his letter, he would call up the company and find out the name of the hiring manager. Thus, he began his letter with "Dear Mr. xxxx" As insignificant as this seems, the candidate ended up getting the job. Years later this young man became the right hand man to the hiring manager who had now become the CEO of the firm. When the hiring manager was asked why he had originally employed the boy he said, "He was not the strongest academically or experienced candidate, but he was the only person out of 100 candidates who had taken the time and effort to find out my name…" Although gaining employment is subject to many unpredictable factors that are far beyond your control (such as employer perceptions, competition and personal choice), there are countless factors that are controllable that you may be doing wrong. Remember, your resume only has 10 seconds to make an impact. When the hiring manager has 100 resumes on his or her desk and needs to pick the top 5, all it takes is the simplest error for your resume to be deleted. My advice is this: If you're going to spend time applying for jobs then DO IT PROPERLY. You are not going to get an interview by sending out a resume that is written or formatted incorrectly. By doing just the smallest things correctly you will find that success is just around the corner. Is your resume full of clichés? Do you use words such as "hardworking", "loyal worker" or "enthusiastic"? Do you send out the exact same resume for every job? If the answer is yes, then you need to take greater effort to differentiate your resume and make it stand out from the crowd. Include your achievements with examples. Don't just write "I am a hardworking individual" as this does not inspire. Rather, explain to the reader why you are a hardworking individual. If you're not inspired by your resume then why is a hiring manager going to be inspired? Your resume is your selling tool. Take a look at it. Are you proud of how it reads? Does it sell your strengths, skills and accomplishments? In this tough economic climate you need to go the extra length to get an interview. Find below 15 reasons why you may be missing out on getting that interview • Generic resume • Resumes that do not inspire • Clichéd resume • Your resume does not use key words • Your resume is formatted incorrectly • Your resume is not targeted • You don't use a cover letter • Your cover letter is boring/generic/clichéd • Your resume and cover letter are too embellished • Your job search is restricted to the Internet/Google/Yahoo • You are only seeking out the perfect job (Is there such a thing?) • Spelling mistakes / bad grammar • Lack of professionalism • No follow up • Unqualified / Overqualified (you need to be realistic)
(0)
170
Research Research Research
Job interviewing
Preparing for the job interview
Rule number 1: Research: Congratulations! You have been invited for the interview. Now what do you do? The first step is beginning to research the company. Once you have done this you will be ready to prep for the interview questions, learn how to improve your interviewing skills and begin to think about what you're going to wear to the interview. In order to succeed in the interview you need to do your homework on the company. There is no set of rules to how to do your research but preparing yourself as much as possible will greatly enhance your chances of getting hired. Make sure you use every available resource to help you with your preparation. By doing a basic Google on the company you can easily learn important facts about the company. Publically listed companies are easier to prepare your background research than privately listed companies as public companies are legally required to make certain information available. In the 21st century the Internet has made a lot of the pre interview research more available and easier to find. Don't forget that you can also use other sources of information like public libraries or bookstores. Many magazines and journals can provide important and up to date information on your company and also provide you with information that your competitors who are also applying for the same job won't know. A true story… A candidate of mine was applying for a job at one of the large investment banks. Out of 150 candidates the hiring manager had selected the top 10 best resumes to perform first round interviews. Every interview was 15-20 minutes long. The final question the hiring manager asked to each of the candidates was "Tell me something about the company." Nine out of ten of the candidates rattled off information they had read from the company's "about us page", but one candidate stood out. After reading about the company's strategic purchase of a new acquisition, the candidate was able to impress the hiring manager with his (somewhat different) knowledge. The hiring manager later offered this candidate the role not because he was the smartest candidate, but because he showed his dedication by going the extra step in his interview preparation. Your research for the job interview preparation should give you a better insight on: • The history of the business • How old the business is • The types of services the business offers • The hierarchy structure • How many offices/locations the business has • Number of employees • Career progression • The business culture • Competitors • Benefits Check out the Competitors websites as well - they are also a good source of information for your job preparation.
(0)
176
Top 10 job interview blunders
Job interviewing
Preparing for the job interview
What should you NOT do in an interview? A poll into interview blunders found that when hiring managers were asked to name the most common and damaging interview mistakes a candidate can make, 51% listed dressing inappropriately. 49% percent cited badmouthing a former boss as the worst offense, while 48% said appearing disinterested. Arrogance (44%), insufficient answers (30%) and not asking good questions (29%) were also top answers. Below is a top 10 selection of mistakes to avoid. A big part of a successful interview is avoiding simple mistakes. Mistakes are deadly to the job seeker and easy to avoid if you are prepared: Arriving Late Get directions from the interviewer - or look up the location on a man. Wear a watch, and leave home early. In the extreme case that you cannot avoid being late, call the interviewer and arrange to reschedule. Lack of Preparation Not being prepared is just about the biggest mistake you can make when it comes to job interviews. You need to prepare for an interview in the same way you would prepare for an exam. When you are offered an interview, make sure you ask what form the interview is going to take so you can prepare. E.g. is it going to be a one on one interview? Will it be a group interview? Who will be attending the interview, and what are their positions? Not being able to answer basic interview questions such as "What do you know about this company?" creates the impression that you don't care, and it can end your chances immediately. Dressing Inappropriately You make your greatest impact on the interviewer in the first 10 seconds, and you want that first impression to be strongly positive. Dress for the occasion. You will certainly need to wear a suit if you are interviewing for professional position. When interviewing for another type of job, such as a casual summer job as a lifeguard or waitress, for example, dress accordingly in neat and casual attire. Badmouthing This includes badmouthing your current or former employers, employees or even the competition. Nobody likes a complainer and it portrays a negative image of your personality. In the world we live in, you never know who your interviewer might be friends with or who the company's clients are. You don't want the interviewer to think that you might speak that way about his or her company in the future. Poor body language • Mumbling • Using constant slang • Crossing your arms • Rigid • Slouching • Nervous gestures e.g. playing with your hair • Using your hands too much when talking • Don't be rude or abusive You would expect this to be obvious, however an interviewer will want to test your patience and see how you react to their questions. Losing your temper, becoming defensive, and acting abusive are the best ways to not get hired. No matter how calm or apologetic you are, the damage has already been done. Poor Communication Skills This includes answering questions with "yes" or "no" answers. You need to display confidence. Engage the person you are speaking with, and let the interviewer know that you are an excellent candidate for this position. Talking Too Much The interviewer wants to know why you are the best person for the job. They do not need to hear your entire life story. There are few things worse than interviewing someone who goes on and on and on. Keep your answers concise, to-the-point, and focused. Don't ramble, and don't lie or make up stories. The best advice is to be honest and simply answer the questions. Not answering the question Nothing is more frustrating for an interviewer than to ask a simple question and not get an answer. Straight away it sets off alarm bells in the interviewer's head that the person is either unprepared or not listening. Make sure you listen to the question and take a moment to gather your thoughts before you respond. Forgetting to Follow Up No matter how well you think the interview went, always follow up. If you have not heard from the interviewer within a few days, don't be afraid to call and follow up and reiterate your interest in the position. A follow up thank you email or phone call can sometimes go a long way to securing you the job. It also leaves a good impression
(0)
183
Job interview killers
Job interviewing
How to ace the interview
When it comes to your job interview, you want to leave it with nothing but positive energy. You want to leave the interviewer thinking that you will most certainly be a positive addition to his or her company. The last thing you want to do is to kill your chances with a simple mistake or two. While there are a number of ways to prepare for a successful interview, there are also a number of ways to quickly end your chances of getting hired. Below are some simple things to avoid during an interview: Showing up late This is not only rude, but it also reflects poorly on your work ethic. Do you routinely show up late? Are you someone who can't be counted on? Don't disqualify yourself before even meeting the interviewer. Forgetting to turn your cell phone off (or keeping it on silent) Having a cell phone ring during an interview is not only disruptive - it's also disrespectful. While it may not be an automatic interview-killer, it certainly won't improve your chances. Chewing gum This looks/sounds unprofessional and tacky. No employer appreciates someone talking to them with a mouthful of gum. It's even worse if you're someone who chews loudly without even realizing. Using "I don't know" as a response to questions The purpose of an interview is to provide the interviewer with more information about you. The more you give them, the better. Using slang or profanity This is never a positive in the workplace. Speak professionally. Bringing up personal problems An interview is about the job in question and about your specific qualifications, not about your personal life. While you will almost always be asked to talk a little bit about yourself, try to keep the personal talk to a minimum. Certainly don't bring up any "issues" that will raise red flags. These "killers" may seem a little obvious, but they happen all the time. Avoid these mistakes and you're already ahead of a large part of the competition.
(0)
236
Top 100 most powerful resume words
Resume writing
Make my resume stand out
In today's society your resume is the most important document you have to get yourself an interview. Including power resume words will increase your chance of getting hired by 80%! When a hiring manager is seeing the same old resume time and time again which includes the cliché words and phrases such as "highly dedicated individual" or "great team player" you are guaranteeing yourself that your resume will be deleted. Poorly chosen words and clichéd phrases can destroy the interest of the reader. Power words when chosen correctly can have the opposite effect of motivating and inspiring the reader Power Resume Words will make help you stand out from your competition and increase your chances of getting hired! Top 100 Power Resume Words Advanced, Assigned, Assessed, Absorbed, Accelerated, Attained, Attracted, Announced, Appraised, Budgeted, Bolstered, Balanced, Boosted, Bargained, Benefited, Beneficial, comply, Critiqued, Closed, Collaborated, Designed, Delegated, Demonstrated, Developed, Detected, Efficient, Enhanced, Excelled, Exceeded, Enriched, Fulfilled, Financed, Forecasted, Formulated, Generated, Guided, Granted, Helped, Hosted, Implemented, Investigated, Increased, Initiated, Influenced, Integrated, Innovated, Instituted, Justified, Listed, Logged, Maintained, Mentored Measured, Multiplied, Negotiated, Observed, Operated Obtained, Promoted, Presented Programmed Provided Projected, Qualified, Quantified, Quoted, Recommended, refine, revamp, reacted, Retained, Recovered, Reinstated, Rejected, Sustained, Skilled, Saved, Scheduled, Supported, Secured, Simplified, Screened, Segmented, Streamlined, Strengthened, Triumphed, Troubleshot, Taught, Tutored, Translated, Trained, Uncovered, United, Unified, Updated, Upgraded, Validated, Viewed, Worldwide, Witnessed
(0)
239
My recently viewed articles
You haven't viewed any articles yet
Select a category for your question
Select category
Characters left: 500
I give LinkMe permission to send my name and email address to RedStarResume. (Your details will not be used for any purposes other than to respond to your question).
Disclaimer: All responses will be sent directly from RedStarResume and LinkMe takes no responsibility for the content. Due to the high volume of questions received, RedStarResume may not be able to respond to each question individually.
This month's top rated article
Top 5 cover letter mistakes

If you're going to take the extra time to write a cover letter that you include along with your resume, you might as well write it properly! We talked to a few recruiters and found out that they frequently find mistakes so annoying that cause them to immediately discard some applications all together. Here's a sample of some of the mistakes they mentioned:

Letter addressed to the wrong person or company: It doesn't annoy hiring managers that you're probably applying for other jobs, but it does annoy them when you don't take the time to check that your cover letter is addressed properly. Sending it to the wrong person or company will get your application deleted immediately.

Spelling and/or grammar mistakes: You're probably tired of being told to check and re-check your work, but it is extremely important! When spelling or grammar errors show up on your cover letter, the person reading it is going to think that you either don't know how to write properly or that you didn't bother to check it over. Either way, it's bad news for you.

It's too long: Cover letters should be short and to the point. They should provide some basic information about how you are specifically qualified for the job in question. That's pretty much it. Anything longer than a few paragraphs starts to look more like an essay, and it's an immediate turn-off.

No contact details: It happens quite frequently - people forget to include their name, let alone a way to contact them. While your details may be on your resume, no one wants to take extra time to fish for information that should have been provided for them right away.

No cover letter: This is the worst mistake of all. You're competing against dozens of other applicants who have instantly shown that they took more time to apply than you.

At the end of the day, you just want to give yourself the best chance possible to be called for an interview. Think about what a potential employer wants to know most about you, and try to convert this into a cover letter.

Read full
Popular questions
1744
0
What should I include in my Australian resume?

A well written and properly presented Australian resume can be your ticket to finding an Australian job. The Australian job market is different to job markets around the world and it is important that your resume is presented in the "Australian way"

Responsibilities, achievements and duties need to be written clearly and backed up with supporting evidence. If these are not present, it is assumed you do not have any experience at all

Use British English ONLY in your Australian Resume - words such as "specialise" and "realise" need to be spelled with an "s" not a "z"

Ensure you tailor EVERY application to suit the job for which you are applying. If you are going to stand out from the crowd, you have to make sure that your application is outstanding

No picture is necessary on your Australian Resume

Do not include personal information such as marital status, date of birth, number of children, occupation of spouse, gender, religious affiliation, colour or race on your resume. It is true that in certain countries (South Africa, for example) personal information is included and is required, however it is not necessary or needed on your Australian Resume

Spend as much time as possible ensuring you address EXACTLY what the Australian employer wants. For example, if the job advertisement lists certain duties for the job, make sure you incorporate these duties into your current resume. If the job requires excellent customer service skills, provide examples about how you have provided excellent customer service

Get the edge on other job seekers and save yourself enormous amounts of time and stress by ensuring your resume ticks all the right boxes.

Read full
Need a professional resume?