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How to make a career change
Career management
Manage your career
It is NEVER too late for a career change! Sure, you might not have direct experience in a certain industry or job, but you need to prove to any hiring manager that your existing skills are, in fact, transferable skills. If you're debating about making a career change, don't be afraid. Even if a career switch later in life seems like a completely radical change with many possible consequences attached to it, you should still go for it if it's something you really want to do. My best advice is to set up a plan before making the dive. A large-scale transition will not happen overnight, and this is why it's important to ensure you have a "plan of attack." Also, make sure your career change is realistic. Although I encourage everyone to follow their dreams, you also need to stay realistic. If your dream is to become a pilot, but you've worked in banking for the last 15 years, the chances of you becoming a pilot are a lot harder (but not impossible)! Also remember to be flexible. You are making a career change that could involve a lower salary or relocation. These are some of the sacrifices you could be asked to make in the short term. When you begin applying for new roles, you need to ensure your resume is targeted toward this new job. Obviously you are not going to have direct experience, so it's important to highlight not only your current skills and achievements, but also (and most importantly), that you are able to adapt your skills for this new job. In making the career change, your skills are by far your best selling point. Many skills that you use on a day to day basis (such as leading, managing, liaising and communicating, for example) are all transferable skills that you can use to prove to a hiring manager that you are right for a particular job. 5 point plan to making a career change 1) Make sure of your reasons for wanting a career change. One bad day at work or hating your boss do not suggest you want to change careers 2) Brainstorming - sit down and brainstorm ideas of the type of industry/job you really want to do 3) Planning - Set out a plan to follow. Make it realistic. Remember your career change won't happen overnight. Realistically, it can take about 6-12 months. Don't quit your job on day 1. Included in planning is financial planning. How much is this career change going to cost you? How much do you plan to get paid? You need to know these answers! 4) Networking - Talk to friends, speak to recruitment agents and sign up to online networking sites 5) Executing your plan. Speak to an expert in regards to interviewing, resume writing and cover letter writing. Apply directly, and begin to follow the steps of your plan.
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Dress for success
Job interviewing
Preparing for the job interview
"Don't Dress for the job you have, dress for the job you want to have" Does what you wear to an interview really make a difference in the hiring process? The answer is yes - the way you dress always matters Don't allow your appearance to damage your chances of being hired for a job. As the old phrase goes, "dress for success!" When you walk into an interview room the very first thing an interviewer does is look at you. No matter how many skills you have and how relevant your experience is, do not allow this first impression to ruin your chances. Make no mistake - dressing properly will not guarantee you the job, but dressing inappropriately can definitely lose you the job. Gaining employment is subject to numerous variables beyond your control and factors significantly unknown to you. You have no control over employer perceptions, personal preferences or the competitors for the job. You do, however, have control of your image and how you present yourself. How you look can send a powerful message to the interviewer and can portray a signal that you are a winner or a loser. You have made it this far in the interview process - don't let your appearance sabotage your opportunity to get the job. So make sure you exude confidence and look successful.
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136
Building a strong relationship with your boss
Career management
In the work place
No one likes a "suck up" or a "teacher's pet", but let's be honest - staying in the manager's good books at work is important not only to keep your job, but for your long term growth. It is highly unlikely that your boss will push to promote you or give you a pay increase if he or she does not like you. It does not seem fair, but this is just the way it is. Learn from your boss Generally speaking, your boss is probably more experienced than you, which is why they're in a position of management. Take time to learn from your boss by asking questions. Don't be afraid to approach them. In most situations, he or she will be happy that you are seeking them out for advice, and in return will be more willing to take the time to help you out. Be honest with your boss If you make a mistake with your work or you've done something wrong, don't try to lie or cover it up. In the long term this can only come back to hurt you. Approach your boss and be honest. Explain the mistake you've made and let them know how you're going to fix it. Nobody is perfect and no one expects you to be perfect. Honesty is the best policy. Your boss will also respect you more for being honest from the beginning rather than trying to hide your mistakes. Don't have an Ego Nobody likes an egomaniac. Lead by example through your actions rather than your words. No matter what job you do or what industry you're in, the best workers always lead by example. Don't take credit for other peoples work Taking credit for other peoples' work is a big no no. Not only is it dishonest, but sooner than later your boss will find out. In the meantime, your co-workers will begin to lose respect for you, which can severely hamper your chances of one day being in a situation where you become their boss. Being a good team player means acknowledging co-workers when they do good work and encouraging everyone to put their best foot forward. Build a positive relationship with your boss not a false relationship Just like you, your boss is only human. Yes they may have more responsibilities, but they still experience and share all the same human feelings as you will feel on a day to day basis. You do not have to be best friends with your boss, but you need to respect them and value their time. Do not try to constantly flatter them. Your boss is no fool and will quickly realise what you are doing. This can severely hurt your relationship as you will lose credibility, and in certain circumstances this can lead to them either disliking you or not taking you seriously. In conclusion, a positive relationship with your boss and co-workers will make for a happy and healthy career. We spend so much of our lives at work that it is important not just to stay on our managers good side for promotion reasons, but also to ensure that we achieve maximum satisfaction from our jobs.
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The process of Career Management
Career management
Manage your career
Career management refers to the planning, supervising, controlling, handling, coping and administrating one's professional life. It comprehensively covers a detailed view of what you want to be, where you want to go, how you will get there and ultimately how long you intend to stay. All the answers are directly related to one's personal goals and targets. Being able to handle changes in your career will best enable you to avoid mistakes of the past, prepare a confident approach to the present and a implement a positive direction for the future. Overall, managing your career will help maintain and develop your professional growth, development and direction. When should I begin to manage my career? Successful career management can start as early as the first day you walk into school or college. One should clearly identify their goals before enrolling in a particular degree or course and preparing for a lifelong career. (This saves a lot of money and time later on down the track!) Be specific with what are you good at and what you enjoy doing; most importantly what you can see yourself doing every day going forward. Being able to answer these questions will help you in understanding yourself better and what areas you are most likely to succeed. If you find that you have made a mistake don't panic. Exhaust your options, understand the value added skills that you have and how best you can utilise these existing skills. Don't be afraid to ask questions. Ask yourself if you are capable of performing the task or if you see yourself progressing in a certain area. If the answer is yes, then begin your quest to achieving your targets. Never forget to network and seek out as many people and opinions as possible. You just never know where the next door will open. How long does career management last for? Career management is a lifelong exercise. Balancing your work and social life is a juggling act. It is not just confined to one period in your life or a particular profession. In life many things change so don't be afraid to change with the times. It is all about adaptability and learning. The ability to learn from every setback will make you smarter in making your next career move. The employment market may seem crowded and not promising, but being open to change will help you survive during those dark months. The changing times are not moments of despair, but rather moments of opportunity.
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Writing a resume with no content to include
Students and grads
Resume preparation
Writing your first resume can be very daunting, especially if you have little to no work experience to speak of. This is a common problem for students, and a lot of them go about addressing this problem the wrong way - they either apply for jobs that do not require a resume, or they turn in a resume with little to no content. DO NOT LEAVE YOUR RESUME BLANK!!! Every person, including you, has skills and knowledge that you can show off, even if you have never worked a day in your life. The challenge is for you to discover and transcribe these skills and knowledge into words. Students, for example, can look to relevant courses and educational achievements - what skills did you pick up from some of your classes? Did you strengthen your written communication skills, for example? Did you increase your knowledge of marketing principles and practices? Students can also write about relevant courses in the same way they would write about a past job. They can provide a brief description of the course, for example, along with "key roles" undertaken and "achievements" that resulted because of their work. I would highly advise catering each resume toward the job you are applying for. Take a look at the job description - does it list qualifications or skills that they are looking for in a candidate? Try to include these somewhere in your resume. Most job seekers are qualified for the positions they apply for, whether they have years of professional experience or not - the challenge is to figure out where you've picked up these skills and to transfer that knowledge onto paper.
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This month's top rated article
Top 5 cover letter mistakes

If you're going to take the extra time to write a cover letter that you include along with your resume, you might as well write it properly! We talked to a few recruiters and found out that they frequently find mistakes so annoying that cause them to immediately discard some applications all together. Here's a sample of some of the mistakes they mentioned:

Letter addressed to the wrong person or company: It doesn't annoy hiring managers that you're probably applying for other jobs, but it does annoy them when you don't take the time to check that your cover letter is addressed properly. Sending it to the wrong person or company will get your application deleted immediately.

Spelling and/or grammar mistakes: You're probably tired of being told to check and re-check your work, but it is extremely important! When spelling or grammar errors show up on your cover letter, the person reading it is going to think that you either don't know how to write properly or that you didn't bother to check it over. Either way, it's bad news for you.

It's too long: Cover letters should be short and to the point. They should provide some basic information about how you are specifically qualified for the job in question. That's pretty much it. Anything longer than a few paragraphs starts to look more like an essay, and it's an immediate turn-off.

No contact details: It happens quite frequently - people forget to include their name, let alone a way to contact them. While your details may be on your resume, no one wants to take extra time to fish for information that should have been provided for them right away.

No cover letter: This is the worst mistake of all. You're competing against dozens of other applicants who have instantly shown that they took more time to apply than you.

At the end of the day, you just want to give yourself the best chance possible to be called for an interview. Think about what a potential employer wants to know most about you, and try to convert this into a cover letter.

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Popular questions
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What should I include in my Australian resume?

A well written and properly presented Australian resume can be your ticket to finding an Australian job. The Australian job market is different to job markets around the world and it is important that your resume is presented in the "Australian way"

Responsibilities, achievements and duties need to be written clearly and backed up with supporting evidence. If these are not present, it is assumed you do not have any experience at all

Use British English ONLY in your Australian Resume - words such as "specialise" and "realise" need to be spelled with an "s" not a "z"

Ensure you tailor EVERY application to suit the job for which you are applying. If you are going to stand out from the crowd, you have to make sure that your application is outstanding

No picture is necessary on your Australian Resume

Do not include personal information such as marital status, date of birth, number of children, occupation of spouse, gender, religious affiliation, colour or race on your resume. It is true that in certain countries (South Africa, for example) personal information is included and is required, however it is not necessary or needed on your Australian Resume

Spend as much time as possible ensuring you address EXACTLY what the Australian employer wants. For example, if the job advertisement lists certain duties for the job, make sure you incorporate these duties into your current resume. If the job requires excellent customer service skills, provide examples about how you have provided excellent customer service

Get the edge on other job seekers and save yourself enormous amounts of time and stress by ensuring your resume ticks all the right boxes.

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